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Corneal Mapping

Corneal topography, also known as photokeratoscopy or videokeratography, is a non-invasive medical imaging technique for mapping the surface curvature of the cornea, the outer structure of the eye. Since the cornea is normally responsible for some 70% of the eye’s refractive power, its topography is of critical importance in determining the quality of vision.

The three-dimensional map is therefore a valuable aid to the examining ophthalmologist or optometrist and can assist in the diagnosis and treatment of a number of conditions; in planning refractive surgery such as LASIK and evaluation of its results; or in assessing the fit of contact lenses. A development of keratoscopy, corneal topography extends the measurement range from the four points a few millimeters apart that is offered by keratometry to a grid of thousands of points covering the entire cornea. The procedure is carried out in seconds and is completely painless.

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

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iON Imaging

Our newest piece of equipment is our iON Imaging System.

Slit-lamp imaging is redefined with our Ion℠ imaging system by combining a new intra-optics beam splitter/camera adapter with the tremendous computing and imaging power of Apple technology. This camera offers a unique image and helps patients understand the pathology of eye disease and provides an opportunity to document ocular changes.

This antertior segment camera that does digital corneal imaging gives an unbelievably clear digital image of the surface of your eye. We can use it to track changes in eye, which is especially helpful cataracts patients, patients with styes, eye freckles, eye infections, allergies, among other issues. Our patients have been amazed with the degree to which they can see what is happening with their eyes!

Digital Retinal Imaging

Digital Retinal Imaging allows your eye doctor to evaluate the health of the back of your eye, the retina. It is critical to confirm the health of the retina, optic nerve and other retinal structures. The digital camera snaps a high-resolution digital picture of your retina. This picture clearly shows the health of your eyes and is used as a baseline to track any changes in your eyes in future eye examinations.

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Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)

An Optical Coherence Tomography scan (commonly referred to as an OCT scan) is the latest advancement in imaging technology. Similar to ultrasound, this diagnostic technique employs light rather than sound waves to achieve higher resolution pictures of the structural layers of the back of the eye.

A scanning laser used to analyze the layers of the retina and optic nerve for any signs of eye disease, similar to an CT scan of the eye. It works using light without radiation, and is essential for early diagnosis of glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetic retinal disease.

With an OCT scan, doctors are provided with color-coded, cross-sectional images of the retina. These detailed images are revolutionizing early detection and treatment of eye conditions such as wet and dry age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, retinal detachment and diabetic retinopathy.

An OCT scan is a noninvasive, painless test. It is performed in about 10 minutes right in our office. Feel free to contact our office to inquire about an OCT at your next appointment.

Humphrey Visual Field Analyzer 3

A visual field test measures the range of your peripheral or “side” vision to assess whether you have any blind spots (scotomas), peripheral vision loss or visual field abnormalities. It is a straightforward and painless test that does not involve eye drops but does involve the patient’s ability to understand and follow instructions.

An initial visual field screening can be carried out by the optometrist by asking you to keep your gaze fixed on a central object, covering one eye and having you describe what you see at the periphery of your field of view.

Visual field testing is most frequently used to detect any signs of glaucoma damage to the optic nerve.

In addition, visual field tests using the latest technology are useful for detection of:

  • Central or peripheral retinal disease
  • Eyelid conditions such as ptosis or drooping, particularly for insurance approval of lid lift surgical procedures optic nerve disease, and diseases affecting the visual pathways within the brain such as tumors, brain swelling, injury or poor circulation, or stroke
  • Testing for macular diseases such as macular degeneration or toxicity from certain medications such as Plaquenil used for rheumatoid arthritis
  • Testing for peripheral retinal disease such as retinal detachment or retinitis pigmentosa

Oculista Stamford CT

Oculista Danbury CT

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New Stamford hours: Monday-Friday 11am-6:30pm, Saturdays 11am-6pm, closed on Sundays.
New Danbury hours: Monday-Friday 11am -6:30pm, Saturdays 11am-6pm, Sundays 12pm-5pm.

New Office Policies Due to the limited number of appointments we can offer at this time during Connecticut’s first phase of re-opening, our office will require a credit card number on file to book an appointment. If you do not show and do not cancel or reschedule 24 hours in advance your card will be charged. Please also be aware that during phase one we will be requiring a digital retinal image to screen the health of each patient’s eyes. To see our COVID-19 practice protocol, please click here.